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CTU: Wages didn’t keep up with productivity

9 Feb

CTU Economist Bill Rosenberg

Workers have been short changed by up to one sixth of the wages they should have earned as a result of employers not sharing the benefits of productivity growth, the Council of Trade Unions said today.

A study released today by the Productivity Commission shows that real wages fell significantly behind productivity growth in a large part of the economy between 1978 and 2010. This resulted in wages and salaries, and labour income of self-employed people getting a falling share of the income the economy generates (the labour income share).

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CTU will not engage in Governments sham consultation process on Terrorist Bill

24 Nov

Media release

CTU will not engage in Governments sham consultation process on Terrorist Bill

Today the CTU has sent a letter to Prime Minister John Key articulating serious concerns about both the content and the rushed process the Government has clearly signalled it intends to follow to progress the Countering Terrorist Fighters Legislation Bill into law and urging him to follow the proper process in considering this legislation.

“Rushing this legislation through is not appropriate or proper. We will not participate in a sham consultation process or take for ourselves the “luxury” of the chance to be heard at the select committee on the basis of some dubious selection criteria made by those to whom the Bill grants power while other legitimately interested citizens and groups are denied that opportunity,” CTU President, Helen Kelly said.

“There has been no evidence presented at all from the Prime Minister that such urgency is needed. Given the severe and unique nature of the powers being sought, quite the opposite is appropriate and a reasonable period of time should be made available for the public to have a say on this legislation,” Kelly said.

“The Bill provides authority for the SIS to trespass onto private property in order to conduct covert surveillance (such as installing video cameras and listening devices). These powers will compromise citizens’ right to avoid unreasonable search and seizure and to privacy. The Bill also extends the ability of the SIS to conduct warrantless surveillance for 48 hours in situations where it would be impracticable to get a warrant and it is believed that information may be lost. Warrantless surveillance as fundamentally irreconcilable with expectations of acceptable government behaviour in a free and open society. The only public accountability for the use of this power is that the SIS must note the number of times this power is used in their annual report,” Kelly said.

ENDS

View the letter here http://union.org.nz/news/2014/ctu-will-not-engage-governments-sham-consultation-process-terrorist-bill

For further comment, please contact:

Helen Kelly, President, CTU

021 776 741

Huia Welton | Communications & Campaigns Advisor | New Zealand Council of Trade Unions – Te Kauae Kaimahi

ph: +64 4 802 3817 | cell: +64 021 524 502 |

www.facebook.com/fairness.at.work | www.union.org.nz | Follow us on twitter: @fairnessNZ

Unions – we’re about Fairness

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22 Aug

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Income gap

15 Aug

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Worksafe must learn lessons – forestry Industry cannot self-regulate

14 Aug

Council of Trade Unions Media release

14 August 2014

“The CTU does not support Worksafe’s submission to the independent Forestry Review Panel that there can be an “industry led” approach to addressing the serious issues workers in the sector are facing.” CTU President, Helen Kelly said.

“We believe Worksafe should learn by experience of its predecessors where industry led initiatives have not worked. In March 2011 MBIE developed a number of Sector Action Plans in our most dangerous industries (Construction, Agriculture, Forestry, Manufacturing and Fishing). They ran until 2013 and were intended to result in a significant reduction in injuries in these sectors. They were industry driven in industries that had shown a lack of capacity to deal with the safety issues. Four of these had an “industry lead” Safety Council structure with only manufacturing having worker representation. In forestry the FOA health and safety committee took on this role. In construction a specific Construction Safety Council was the lead industry body and similarly in Agriculture (Agriculture Health and Safety Council). In Fishing, Maritime NZ took a different approach and led the Safety Council initiative (Fishsafe) The only industry where serious harm injuries notably reduced was fishing. In others the figures increased.” Kelly said.

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High Unemployment

14 Aug

It doesn’t have to be like this (4/10)

Worker’s rights: Why insecure work exists and why it’s a problem

13 Aug

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